Stayton Acres Bean and Lentil Chili

Stayton Acres Spicy Bean and Lentil Chili12 minutes InstantPot
Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 15 minutes

Servings: 8 
I’m inspired to make a chili that will need a Stayton Acre avocado on top to offset the heat. Today is Day 22 for me living in my travel trailer. I’m excited that I’m doing this with little stress really. We are eating healthy meals and having a salad everyday. 
This recipe was created with plenty of hearty protein and vegetables in mind.  
Serve with sourdough, crunched up tortillas on top or corn bread.  
Don’t forget to chop sliced avocado on top.
1 yellow onion, chopped

Ingredients

5 garlic cloves, chopped

1T EVOO
1 16oz can black beans

1 16oz can garbanzo beans 

1 16oz can red kidney beans
1 cup orange lentils

1 yellow bell pepper chopped

1 red bell pepper chopped

1 corn on the cob fresh kernels removed

3 celery stalks, chopped

1 14.5oz can of fire roasted diced tomatoes

Spices (IT’S ALL IN THE SPICES!!)

1T cumin powder

1 ½ t chili powder (hot)

2T smoked paprika

1/2t coriander

1t black pepper

3/4t salt

1/2t cayenne pepper powder
Avocado (depending on how many people love avocado…I like ¼ large avocado per person chopped on top).

 

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Common Sense Stuff About Getting OLD

Randy Morgan having dinner talking in kitchen Feb 2013
Father’s give good advice.

MACRO AND MICRO NUTRIENTS
Keeping it simple helps you make a better choice

Our bodies are miracles.

Get a cut and your body will heal it.  Break your leg…bam…it will repair it!  This also includes: shave your legs and DANG IT…is there a REASON we need hair on our shin in this day and age?!

The natural growth of a body is like a plant growing from a seed.

Plant a seed good soil filled with nutrients, make sure it gets water and sun then watch it blossom to its full potential.

Science has proven that the right (or correct) balance of macro and micro nutrients is not simple at all.

According to the USDA’s website an article by Adrienne Youdim, MD, FACP  “Overview of Nutrition: Macronutrients” starts off strong with “Nutrition is the science of food and its relationship to health. Nutrients are chemicals in foods that are used by the body for growth, maintenance, and energy. Nutrients that cannot be synthesized by the body and thus must be derived from the diet are considered essential. They include vitamins, minerals, some amino acids, and some fatty acids. Nutrients that the body can synthesize from other compounds, although they may also be derived from the diet, are considered nonessential. Macronutrients are required by the body in relatively large amounts; micronutrients are needed in minute amounts.”

The bottom line is: we need vitamins, minerals, some amino acids and some fatty acids.

Wrap - bean veggie carrot
That’s a wrap! Steamed carrots, black beans, cabbage on lettuce. Spicy hot chili sauce (sriracha).

As we age there are plenty of road signs telling us: GET UP AND MOVE!  That burns energy which means EAT!

A progressive loss of lean body mass can occur with aging.  Starting after 40 years old women lose about 11 lbs and men 22 lbs of muscle!  Add in the lack of nutritient-dense foods plus sedentary lifestyles and that will increase.  Ref: Merck Manual Overview of Undernutrition by John E. Morley, MB, BCh.

Mr. Morley writes, “Aging decreases basal metabolic rate (due mainly to decreased fat-free mass), total body weight, height, and skeletal mass; from about age 40 to age 65, mean body fat (as a percentage of body weight) increases to about 30% (from 20%) in men and to 40% (from 27%) in women.”

So let’s get outside, build up our fat-free mass (imagine what body parts we’re talking about)  and eat foods filled with nutrients.

For our campers: bring multiple sets of varying weights to camp to do, especially if you are a believer in the science of our bodies and want to stave off “old age” problems.

Just for kicks take a minute to look at different foods you eat and compare them to the Percentage Daily Recommended (%DV) of an adult consuming a 2,000 calorie reference diet.  Remember: your personal daily values may be different.

I use Nutrition Data for a quick and detailed report. Personally I love charts and maps and could spend hours just staring at them “imagining” scenarios that apply to my own life or plans.

If you are wondering what your daily requirements should be, visit the USDA’s National Agricultural Library where health care professionals go to calculate the information.

References:
Overview Of Nutrition by Adrienne Youdim, MD, FACP
http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/nutritional-disorders/nutrition-general-considerations/overview-of-nutrition?qt=&sc=&alt=#

Undernutrition by John E. Morley, MB, BCh
http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/nutritional-disorders/undernutrition/overview-of-undernutrition#

Roasted Butternut Squash On Fresh Spinach

Serves 3Roasted Butternut squash pine nuts and quinoa on spinach
Prep/cook time 60 minutes (due to baking…using a la cruset pot would make it half the time!)
Perfect for: Lunch, Dinner
Level: Easy

Ingredients

5 cups of rinsed uncut raw Indian Summer spinach  (or whatever kind you love raw)
3 cups of butternut squash cut into cubes
2c cooked quinoa
⅓ c roasted (I roasted mine) pine nuts
2T evoo
1 ½ t cumin ground
1 t of coriander
1/4t cayenne pepper
to taste:  salt, black ground pepper, red pepper flakes (Randy PILED it on)

Heat oven to 425.
Prep cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Put EVOO and spices (cumin, coriander, cayenne) in a large bowl and whisk well.
Add chopped butternut squash (any squash would work).
Mix vigorously!

Place squash flat on cookie sheet.

Bake for 30 minutes.  After halfway turn the squash to change the side that is on the cookie sheet.  I did this by pulling cookie sheet out of oven and taking the edges of the parchment paper and sort of jostling them around.  This really worked great to mix up their positions.  Put back in oven for remaining 15 minutes.

WATCH close after 20 minutes.  You don’t want to burn these!  They should get “crispy” but also soft through.

While it cooks, roast your pine nuts on the lower shelf in oven for 10 minutes.  Also shake these around to evenly distribute their “baked” side.  Mmmmmm…YUM.

Prep your two plates with rinsed and patted dry spinach.  I use my salad spinner.  Spinach can be super dirty (especially the organic type) with actual dirt and that makes gritty bites.  Bleh.  I rinse well.  I left the tips on because I like the stems.  Your choice.

Warm up your quinoa (you should make a big batch to pull from all week). If none made, it takes 15 minutes or whatever your instructions are.  Follow them for perfect quinoa.

Once roasting squash is done mix it LIGHTLY with your quinoa.  Place on top of spinach.  Then divide the pine nuts and toss them on top.

Serve it up!

I put a teaspoon of Neumann’s Own EVOO salad dressing on my spinach to jazz it up.  Randy ate his with a lot of red pepper flakes.

Salt and pepper TO TASTE means you do it right before serving.  Don’t kill the recipe with too much salt.